Monday 4 March, 2024

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Tartan was not banned after Culloden

The Dress Act 1746, also known as the Disclothing Act, was a part of the Act of Proscription which was introduced by the government after the defeat of the 1745 Jacobite Rising at Culloden....

When the Jacobites fined the town of Paisley

On 29 December 1745, a summons was issued by Charles Edward Stuart from Glasgow to the magistrates of Paisley demanding that the town pay a £1,000 fine for raising a militia regiment against the...

The Humbie Heinkel

On 28 October 1939, a Heinkel He 111 bomber was intercepted by Spitfires of No. 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron and No. 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron and shot down near the village of Humbie...

Butter Bridge in Glen Kinglas

Butter Bridge stands in the shadow of Beinn Ime and crosses the gently flowing Kinglas Water in Glen Kinglas, Argyll. The bridge was built in 1749 as part of Major William Caulfeild's military road...

The Scottish Highland Clans: Origins, Decline and Transformation

The Highland, Gaelic-speaking clans are a vital part of Scotland’s history. They also shape how the world imagines Scotland today. This course uses the expertise of University of Glasgow academics to explain the structure, economy...

Rout of Moy during the Jacobite ’45

On the night of 16-17 February 1746, a government force of around 1,500 from the 64th Highlanders and the Independent Highland Companies under the command of John Campbell, 4th Earl of Loudoun, attempted to...

Tummel Bridge

Tummel Bridge is situated at the western end of Loch Tummel in Perthshire and was built in 1730 to carry Lieutenant-General George Wade’s Crieff to Dalnacardoch military road across the River Tummel. General Wade in...

Ruthven Barracks

Ruthven Barracks (pronounced 'Riven') is situated on the south side of the River Spey overlooking the small town of Kingussie in Badenoch and was constructed between 1720 and 1724 on the site of an...